Religion Behind Bars – Further Reading

On April 4, 2019, Philadelphia Commons Institute hosted a Religion Behind Bars: Transformation, Rehabilitation & Criminal Justice, a lecture on inmate-led religious movements by Dr. Byron Johnson, director of the Institute for Studies of Religion.  The lecture included many references to studies, books, and articles, which we have listed here for your convenience.

 

Church Attendance Protects Individuals from Crime, Delinquency, Drug/Alcohol Abuse & Domestic Violence

  • “Who Escapes the Crime of Inner-Cities: Church Attendance and Religious Salience Among Disadvantaged Youth,” Justice Quarterly, B.R. Johnson, D.B. Larson, S.J. Jang, & S. Li, 17: 701-715 (2000).
     
  • “The ‘Invisible Institution’ and Black Youth Crime: The Church as an Agency of Local Social Control,” Journal of Youth and Adolescence, B.R. Johnson, D.B. Larson, S.J. Jang, & S.D. Li, 29:479-498 (2000).
     
  • “Neighborhood Disorder, Individual Religiosity, and Adolescent Drug Use: A Test of Multilevel Hypotheses,” Criminology, S.J. Jang & B.R. Johnson, 39:501-535, 2001.
     
  • “Does Adolescent Religious Commitment Matter?: A Reexamination of the Effects of Religiosity on Delinquency,” Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency, B.R. Johnson, S.J. Jang, D.B. Larson, & S.D. Li, 38: 22-44, 2001.
     
  • Soft Patriarchs, New Men: How Christianity Shapes Fathers & Husbands, W.B. Wilcox, Chicago Press (2004).
     
  • Soul Mates: Religion, Sex, Love, and Marriage among African Americans and Latinos, N.H. Wolfinger & W.B. Wilcox, New York: Oxford University Press (2016).
     
  • “Religion and Domestic Violence: An Examination of Variations by Race and Ethnicity,” Violence Against Women, C.G. Ellison, J.A. Trinitapoli, K.L. Anderson, & B.R. Johnson 13: 1094-1112 (2007).
     
  • “Religion, Race, and Drug Use Among American Youth,” Interdisciplinary Journal of Research on Religion, S.J. Jang & B.R. Johnson, 6: 1-25 (2010).
     
  • “The Effects of Childhood Exposure to Drug Users and Religion on Drug Use in Adolescence and Young Adulthood” Youth and Society, S.J. Jang & B.R. Johnson, 43:1220-1245 (2011).

 

Church Attendance Enhances Prosocial Behavior

  • “A Tale of Two Religious Effects: Evidence for the Protective and Pro-Social Impact of Religious Practice on Youth,” B.R. Johnson in Hardwired to Connect: Social, Moral, and Spiritual Foundations of Child Well-Being, Commission on Children at Risk: Dartmouth (2002).
     
  • “Strain, Negative Emotions, and Deviant Coping among African Americans: A Test of General Strain Theory and the Buffering Effects of Religiosity,” Journal of Quantitative Criminology, S.J. Jang & B.R. Johnson, 19:79-105 (2003).
     
  • “Explaining Religious Effects on Distress among African Americans,” S.J. Jang & B.R. Johnson, Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 43 (2):239-260 (2004).
     
  • “Explaining Religious Effects on Distress among African Americans,” Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion S.J. Jang & B.R. Johnson, 43 (2): 239-260 (2004).
     
  • “Gender, Religiosity, and Reactions to Strain among African Americans,” Sociological Quarterly, S.J. Jang & B.R. Johnson, 46 (2): 323-358 (2005).
     
  • “The Cumulative Advantage of Religiosity in Preventing Drug Use,” Journal of Drug Issues, S.J. Jang, C. Bader, & B.R. Johnson, 38 (3): 771-798, (2008).
     
  • “Teenage Religiosity and Changes in Marijuana Use During the Transition to Adulthood,” Interdisciplinary Journal of Research on Religion, J.T. Ulmer, S. Desmond, S.J. Jang, & B.R. Johnson, 6: 1-19 (2010).
     
  • “Religiosity and Dynamics of Marijuana Use: Initiation, Persistence, and Desistence,” Deviant Behavior, J.T. Ulmer, S. Desmond, S.J. Jang 33: 448-468 (2012).

 

Bible-Based Programs Help Rehabilitate Prisoners and Reduce Recidivism

  • “Religious Programming, Institutional Adjustment and Recidivism Among Former Inmates in Prison Fellowship Programs,” Justice Quarterly 14:145-166 (1997).
     
  • The InnerChange Freedom Initiative: A Preliminary Evaluation of a Faith-Based Prison Program, Institute for Studies of Religion (ISR Research Report), Baylor University (2003) http://www.baylorisr.org/publications/isr-reports/.
     
  • “Religious Programs & Recidivism Among Former Inmates in Prison Fellowship Programs: A Long-Term Follow-Up Study,” Justice Quarterly 21: 329-354 (2004).
     
  • More God, Less Crime: Why Faith Matters and How it Could Matter More. Conshohocken, PA: Templeton Press (2011).

 

Bible-Based Programs are Cost-Effective

  • “Estimating the Benefits of a Faith-Based Correctional Program,” International Journal of Criminology and Sociology G. Duwe & B.R. Johnson, 2: 227-239 (2013).
     
  • A Case Study of the Prison Entrepreneurship Program: Recidivism Reduction and Return on Investment: An Empirical Assessment of the Prison Entrepreneurship. Special Report. B.R. Johnson, W. Wubbenhorst, & C. Schroeder. Baylor University: Institute for Studies of Religion, Program on Prosocial Behavior (2013).

 

Article on the Prison-Built Casket

 

Book on Dr. Johnson’s Research at Angola

  • Hallett, Michael A., et al. The Angola prison seminary: Effects of faith-based ministry on identity transformation, desistance, and rehabilitation. Routledge, 2016.

 

Additional publications on Angola

  • G. Duwe, M. Hallett, J. Hays, S.J. Jang, & B.R. Johnson, “Bible College Participation and Prison Misconduct: A Preliminary Analysis,” Journal of Offender Rehabilitation 54, no. 5 (2015): 371–90.
     
  • M. Hallett, J. Hays, B.R. Johson, S.J. Jang, and G. Duwe, The Angola Prison Seminary: Effects of Faith-Based Ministry on Identity Transformation, Desistance, and Rehabilitation (New York: Routledge, 2016)
     
  • M. Hallett, J. Hays, B.R. Johnson, S.J. Jang, and G. Duwe, “First Stop Dying’: Angola’s Christian Seminary as Positive Criminology,” International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology 61 (4): 445–63 (2017).
     
  • B.R. Johnson, G. Duwe, M. Hallett, J. Hays, S.J. Jang, M.T. Lee, M.E. Pagano, & S.G. Post, “Faith and Service: Pathways to Identity Transformation and Correctional Reform,” in Finding Freedom in Confinement: The Role of Religion in Prison Life, ed. K.R. Kerley, 3–23 (Santa Barbara, CA: Praeger, 2018).
     
  • J. Hays, “Reading Scripture in Exile: Favorite Scriptures among Maximum-Security Inmates Participating in Bible College Degree Programs,” in Finding Freedom in Confinement: The Role of Religion in Prison Life, ed. K.R. Kerley, 196–213 (Santa Barbara, CA: Praeger, 2018).
     
  • S.J. Jang, B.R. Johnson, J. Hays, M. Hallett, and G. Duwe, “Religion and Misconduct in ‘Angola’ Prison: Conversion, Congregational Participation, Religiosity, and Self-Identities,” Justice Quarterly 35 (3): 412–42 (2017).
     
  • J. Hays, M. Hallett, B.R. Johnson, S.J. Jang, & G. Duwe, “Inmate Ministry as Contextual Missiology: Best Practices for America’s Emerging Prison Seminary Movement,” Perspectives in Religious Studies 45 (1): 69–79 (2018).

 

New and forthcoming publications

  • M. Hallett, B.R. Johnson, J. Hays, S.J. Jang, & G. Duwe, “U.S. Prison Seminaries: Structural Charity, Religious Establishment, and Neoliberal Corrections,” The Prison Journal (March 2019).
     
  • S.J. Jang, J. Hays, B.R. Johnson, M. Hallett, & G. Duwe, “Images of God, Religious Involvement and Prison Misconduct among Inmates,” Corrections: Policy, Practice and Research, DOI 10.1080/23774657.2017.1384707.
     
  • S.J. Jang, J. Hays, B.R. Johnson, M. Hallett, & G. Duwe, “‘Four Gods’ in Maximum Security Prison: Images of God, Religiousness, and Worldviews among Inmates,” Review of Religious Research (2018).
     
  • S. J. Jang, B.R. Johnson, J. Hays, M. Hallett, & G. Duwe, “Existential and Virtuous Effects of Religiosity on Mental Health and Aggressiveness among Offenders,” Religions (2018).

 

Publications on Alcohol and Drug Treatment

  • “Daily Spiritual Experiences and Adolescent Treatment Response,” Alcohol Treatment Quarterly, 32: 271-298 (2014) M.T. Lee, M.E. Pagano, B.R. Johnson, & P.S. Veta.
     
  • “Social Anxiety and Peer-Helping in Adolescent Addiction Treatment,” Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, 39 (5): 887-895 (2015), M.E. Pagano, A.R. Wang, B.M. Rowles, B.R. Johnson, & M.T. Lee.
     
  • “Positive Psychology Virtues in Alcoholics Anonymous and the 12 Steps: Adolescent Recovery in Relation to Humility, Kindness and Spirituality,” American Psychological Association Division 50 (2015) S.G. Post, B.R. Johnson, M.T. Lee, & M.E. Pagano.
     
  • “Alone on the Inside: The Impact of Social Isolation and Helping Others on AOD Use and Criminal Activity,” Youth and Society, (2015) B.R. Johnson, M. Lee, M. Pagano, & S.G. Post.
     
  • “Love and Service in Adolescent Addiction Recovery,” Alcohol Treatment Quarterly 34: 197-222 (2016), M. Lee B.R. Johnson, M.E. Pagano, & S.G. Post.
     
  • “Humility and 12-Step Recovery: A Prolegomenon for the Empirical Investigation of a Cardinal Virtue,” Alcohol Treatment Quarterly 34 (2): 262-273 (2016), S.G. Post, B.R. Johnson, M. Pagano, & M. Lee.
     
  • “Positive Criminology and Rethinking the Response to Adolescent Addiction: Evidence on the Role of Social Support, Religiosity, and Service to Others.” International Journal of Criminology and Sociology 5: 75-85 (2016), B.R. Johnson, M. Lee, M.E. Pagano, & S. Post.
     
  • “From Defiance to Reliance: Spiritual Virtue as a Pathway towards Desistence, Humility, and Recovery among Juvenile Offenders,” Spirituality in Clinical Practice, 4: 161–175 (2017), M.T. Lee, M.E. Pagano, B.R. Johnson, S.G. Post, & G. Leibowitz.

 

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